Is over-planning impacting your photography?

Is over-planning impacting your photography?

This week’s podcast focuses on something that has impacted my photography and creative practice more than once–over-planning. When I am getting ready for a big trip or photographic adventure, I do a lot of research about where, when, and what to photograph. All that research can sometimes come in handy, but other times, this results in my over-planning my time costing me some photographic opportunities.

In my own process, I have found over-planning shows up and causes me some angst in five primary ways. I don’t think one is worse than another, but each can cause problems. Those areas in no particular order are:

over-packing too much gear

getting too much information to process

can’t react at the moment

can’t respond to cool changes in the plan

disappointment.

These five things often show up when I over-plan and don’t properly plan for my shoots. Do any of these show up in your process or do you have others not mentioned that happen when you over-plan an adventure?

Games played and a lost and found

Games played and a lost and found

I recently watched a group of kids make up playing a game in the park and it sparked an idea for how to better approach my own photographic practice. This week’s podcast takes a look at that process and how the end result made for a new approach to my creative practice. 

Why photographs should read, draw and sit still

Why photographs should read, draw and sit still

I get asked all the time what it takes to be a better photographer. Is there a class to take or a book to read? I always come back to the basics that photography is about seeing, telling a story, and finding your sense of self in your work. This week’s podcast talks about the importance and value of taking the time to draw and sketch, reading all types of books and finally the importance of learning to observe the world around you. 

The challenge of should and would

The challenge of should and would

In this week’s podcast, we take a look at the impacts of talking about the effects of the should and would in our creative photography. So much of what we do as photographers is damaged when we focus on what we should be doing and what we would be doing rather than what we are doing in the present.  

In my own experience, should and would are indicators of living in the past or future rather than focusing on what I am doing now in the present. What I would do is future based, and what I should be doing is out of guilt from the past. As discussed in the podcast, there is a huge benefit from learning to let go of saying should and would and embracing the power of focusing on what you are doing right now. 

Does fear of missing out cost you?

Does fear of missing out cost you?

I have several friends who are obsessed with the news. They watch it for 18 hours a day. They worry that something will happen that they might miss. Something will trend that they don’t know about. In this week’s podcast, we talk about how that fear of missing out can show up in three ways that could impact your creative process. 

The first topic is chasing trends. Everyone has something they love, but it is hard some times to no jump on the popular bus that everyone seems to be riding. If you give up what you love to chase a trend, what does that cost your creativity?

The second area is the importance of getting out of your head. Does the need to be in the know cause you to make us all sorts of stories that aren’t true that you can’t let go. Does your creativity suffer from being wrapped up inside your internal monologues? 

Finally, we talk about how fear and failure go hand in hand. The fear of missing out can lead to how you contextualize failure. If you redefine failure, does that shift your fear of missing out from a failure to know into something more productive? 

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