The challenge of should and would

In this week’s podcast, we take a look at the impacts of talking about the effects of the should and would in our creative photography. So much of what we do as photographers is damaged when we focus on what we should be doing and what we would be doing rather than what we are doing in the present.  

In my own experience, should and would are indicators of living in the past or future rather than focusing on what I am doing now in the present. What I would do is future based, and what I should be doing is out of guilt from the past. As discussed in the podcast, there is a huge benefit from learning to let go of saying should and would and embracing the power of focusing on what you are doing right now. 

Does fear of missing out cost you?

I have several friends who are obsessed with the news. They watch it for 18 hours a day. They worry that something will happen that they might miss. Something will trend that they don’t know about. In this week’s podcast, we talk about how that fear of missing out can show up in three ways that could impact your creative process. 

The first topic is chasing trends. Everyone has something they love, but it is hard some times to no jump on the popular bus that everyone seems to be riding. If you give up what you love to chase a trend, what does that cost your creativity?

The second area is the importance of getting out of your head. Does the need to be in the know cause you to make us all sorts of stories that aren’t true that you can’t let go. Does your creativity suffer from being wrapped up inside your internal monologues? 

Finally, we talk about how fear and failure go hand in hand. The fear of missing out can lead to how you contextualize failure. If you redefine failure, does that shift your fear of missing out from a failure to know into something more productive? 

Small Rituals Big Results

I was cleaning a bookshelf in the study and came back across Mason Currey’s Daily Rituals. In the book, Mason details the daily rituals that artist and creatives spend their day. As I flipped back thru the book, I got to thinking about the small things that we do and how they can make a huge difference in our approach to photography and creativity. 

In my case, something as simple as taking the cap off my favorite fountain pen tells me that something significant is happening. It doesn’t mean that what I write is great, but that everything I do with that pen makes me happier than when I use a different pen. Cleaning the nozzles for each printer in the studio every Friday reminds me of the importance of printing in my work. 

As you think about your little routines, I am sure that you might find something that, when you do it, makes everything seem better or more significant to your work. This week’s podcast explores some of those rituals and how we can try to find ways to improve on what we do by celebrating those small rituals by making more significant results in our work. 

“I feel very fortunate to have met, worked and studied with Daniel Gregory. He’s thoughtful, engaging, and talented both technically and creatively.  I’ve had the chance to learn from him both one-on-one and in a group setting. He is a wonderful teacher and mentor.”

Jeff Merriman-Cohen

Color correction cheat sheet

Learning to print in color is about using a system of opposites to balance the photograph. This is the same process in the analog darkroom and in black and white printing. You add light to make it darker, subtract light to make it brighter and add the...