Do you better your subjects?

As photographers, we are always trying to make our photos better. We might work with new camera gear, make editing enhancements in the darkroom or try out some technique in Photoshop. We are always trying to make the best photograph possible. In this week’s episode focuses on the importance of bettering not just the photograph but the subject of the photograph as well. Where is the source of your work coming from and what is its intention? Does your work come from ego alone or are you trying to make something bigger than yourself? As we work with our subjects, do we make sure that they get as much from the experience as the photographer does? As I explore this topic, we talk about how to find a real connection with your subjects and how to make sure that you aren’t just enhancing your images but also what you put in front of the lens. 

March madness and photography

Every March in the US brings a bit of crazy to the workplace. The NCAA march madness tournament begins. This one and done competition has become a big focus of both all types of sports fans. Even people who don’t usually care about sports will fill out a bracket in their office pool. If you don’t know about the tournament, it starts with some play in games but gets set with 64 teams all trying to win the national championship for college basketball. The great part of the three weeks is that sometimes David does slay Goliath. The other big part of the season is that tons of people fill out a bracket in an attempt to figure out who will win what game and advance to the next round. Points are given, and dollars exchanged. It does bring an office together. However, as I no longer fill out a bracket and do the office thing, I did start to wonder could all the hype of the NCAA tourney be brought back into our creative practice. This week’s podcast is about how to use the craze and hype of bracketology to help us better our photograph and visual literacy.The first game is to select your 64 best images and put them into the bracket, and run images head to head to find your best. Remembering that it is a seeded tournament, so you have to break apart your one seeds from your two seeds. Upsets occur all the time to a 16 seed can beat a one seed. Second, you can list out your 64 biggest issue you have with your photography no matter how big or small and then use the bracket to help you narrow down your focus to only what needs your attention. Your final four eliminates 60 other things you think you need to focus on but can likely let go.

That song is driving me crazy

Ever get a song stuck in your head? One that loops or part of it loops, over and over again. It just won’t seem to go away like a never-ending punishment for some karma thing you did. It turns out that part of the reason this happens is that we can’t finish the song or remember the rest of the song. In many cases, just listening to the song will help us move past the mind-numbing loop. Our photograph can be a little like that at times. We have some aspect of our work or our process that never seems to finish. We can’t let it go either, so it loops over and over. We might try to avoid it, but we know that it will just keep coming back. In this week’s podcast, we take a look at how these loops can happen in our work and in some ways they impact what we do and how to break the cycle. 

“I feel very fortunate to have met, worked and studied with Daniel Gregory. He’s thoughtful, engaging, and talented both technically and creatively.  I’ve had the chance to learn from him both one-on-one and in a group setting. He is a wonderful teacher and mentor.”

Jeff Merriman-Cohen

Color correction cheat sheet

Learning to print in color is about using a system of opposites to balance the photograph. This is the same process in the analog darkroom and in black and white printing. You add light to make it darker, subtract light to make it brighter and add the...