Don’t blame the viewer, except……

Don’t blame the viewer, except……

Sometimes I hear someone say something and it gets me thinking about my approach to my photography. I recently overheard someone say don’t shoot the messenger. This got me to thinking about how many times we blame the viewer for not getting our understanding of our photographs. 

This week’s podcast is all about how we can help to overcome our frustration with others when they just don’t get our work. It is easy to blame the viewer as just not getting it, but I believe there is an opportunity for each of us to step back from our work and think about our approach. Are we as clear as we can be with our story, emotion, composition, and frame? Do we know what our work is about? Do we have clarity of purpose in our work or is it still vague in our mind? We can’t really expect someone else to get it if we don’t on some level get our own work, can we?

The one exception I have to not blaming the viewer is around personal experiences.

Dealing with noise in an image

Dealing with noise in an image

Noise is a result of how the digital sensor capture process deals with variables in light levels. The noise is caused by unwanted signal information on the camera’s sensor. Each sensor has a base level ISO and when the sensor needs to become “more sensitive” to...
Don’t blame the viewer, except……

Lessons learned from software release notes in my photography

This week’s podcast dives into how to think about your photography and ideas to approach your editing using some of the concepts and sections you find in most software release notes. This release note template gives us an opportunity to create a plan, outline, and goals for editing. They can also serve as a to-do list when we need to make new work going forward. I am sure most of you will never dive deep into software release notes. Still, I think you can get something useful from the practice that industry has adopted.

Don’t blame the viewer, except……

How do you define a photograph?

This week’s podcast dives into how we define a photograph and photography. For me there are three key aspects of a photograph. They are time-bound, indexical, and is represented by an object of some type (print, slide, etc). For you, I imagine you might have different ideas of what might be a photo. I hope that you get some aspects to consider and spend some time coming up with your own definition of a photograph. 

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