How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

It is really easy to feel overburdened when working on your photography. There is so much to learn, photograph, and share that you can quickly start to feel like you are under a tremendous amount of pressure to deliver. It might be pressure for time, expectations being met, desire, or just plain ego. No matter the cause, the notion that we are under so much pressure to produce that we get stuck might be caused by how we think about production and creating meaningful work.
When we get under too much pressure, it can result in us not having a chance to create meaningful work. We begin to think about all the things that can go wrong or breakdown in our process rather than celebrating the good. What we need are some release values to help us identify and remove some of the pressure. In this week’s podcast, we take a look at how the idea that pressure and production of images are related and some techniques or release values to help us move past and get out from under this feeling.

How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

When the camera does it job better than you thought possible, then what is the excuse for bad photographs?

I was having a conversation about the advances in camera technology and how at some point in the not to distant future the camera will make a perfect captured frame with exact colors, focus, infinity depth-of-field possibilities, etc. My friend was all excited about that possibility. I, in turn, asked what happens when the camera is no longer to blame for a bad photograph? And if it isn’t the camera, how is that different today.

In this week’s podcast, we dive into that question of what is really at the core of a bad photograph. Over the course of the podcast, I talk about how if we assume the great camera exists, what impacts will that have on how we critique, edit and review our work and the work of others. In the end, I realize that even with today’s amazing cameras, it might be time that we stop making excuses for not seeing as if they were rooted in the camera faults because one day, that may not be an option

How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

How sacred places, people and things can change our approach to our photography

A sacred place or thing historically as been often associated with the worship of a deity or god. However, something can be sacred, even outside the context of religion. There could be places, people, ideas, or things that inspire, stimulate, are worthy of honor, or hold meaning in our lives. These sacred things could be very personal or allow us to connect with something bigger than just ourselves.
In this week’s podcast, we talk about how our approach to sacred can impact our photography. In some cases, it can shine a light on what matters to us when we photograph. Other times, it might help us understand why we gravitate towards one photograph over another. Other times, it might help us not pick up a camera out of respect for someone else’s sacred place. As we discuss this notion of sacred in photography, I hope that it gives you a chance to reflect on what is important to you in your work and how your work might be able to provide you with an opportunity to honor what really matters to you.

How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

Notions of the precious photographic moment

A friend recently recanted a story to me about how, when he was in school, they were only allowed to shoot one roll (36 frames) a week for homework. No more than that one roll for any week. He talked about how each frame became more critical because of the discipline and experience you had to have to get the best of the week in those 36 frames.
As he was talking, he mentioned that each frame was more precious than he imagined when he started. That got me thinking about the notion of precious in photography. This week’s podcast takes a look at how we approach the things we photograph, places we photograph, and ideas we photography as a container for what is precious to us. Rather than focusing on what is sharable, likable or not, this week I talk about how we can shift our approach to thinking about work and creating work so that each of however many frames we take are precious little gems.

How does being focused on production lead to unnecessary pressure in our photography?

Why opposites aren’t always an either or proposition

A recent trip to the store had me overhear a couple talking about how opposites attract. I couldn’t get that idea out of my head and how it might apply to photography. I eventually made a list of opposites that I could think of related to photography. As I completed the list, I realized that many of these are no opposites that attract or repel but rather work together.

This week’s podcast takes a look at how to develop a list of opposites and how diving deeper into the word pairs can lead to a shift in your approach to seeing behind the camera and appreciating your photography. It doesn’t matter what you photograph or how far along you are in your process, getting a better understanding of your mental framing and approach to your work with this exercise might lead you to some interesting insights.

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