Part A inserts into part R and twist

If you have ever tried to put together a piece of furniture from IKEA or have been pulling your hair out because your friend can't give you good directions to their house, this week's podcast is for you.That is a challenge that I am asking you to take on this week. I want you to create some instructions for how you take a photograph and edit a picture. Then use those instructions to teach you about your process. What have you missed, skipped, repeated, or do for no reason you can figure out. Then examine what you can shift to try and find a new way to access your creative process. One of the most significant challenges we often face is understanding why we do something. By slowing way down and focusing on the smallest task, we might find some insight into why we make our work.
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Upside down and backwards

I was recently at an art opening that had several photographs of interesting abstractions. Images of plants, buildings, and objects all taken and presented as abstract objects. In listening to people talk about the work, I heard people discussing what they saw in the images or what they thought the actual object in the photograph was. I also observed that many people would tilt their head left or right to gain a new perspective. That tilting reminded me of working with a large-format camera which flips an image upside down and backwards. In this week's podcast, we talk about the advantages of using the power of flipping the perspective of an image to help us better understand the nature of seeing, editing, composing and creating more well-seen images. Sometimes to gain an insight into more meaningful work, we need to see the world differently.
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Dangers of too much

There are many traps out there to keep us from making the types of photography that we want to create. Some of them are simple to see, while others are more complex in nature. As I was sitting in the studio watching my dog flip the pillows off the sofa she gets to sit on; it occurred to me that too much of something, even a pillow on a couch, might be a bad thing. In this week's podcast, we take a look at the impact of too much of something and what that can do to your photography and creative living. The two topics of gear and processing we quickly gloss over so that we can turn our attention to the impacts of talking too much, seeing too much and having too much time for our work. Each of those areas can be useful and helpful in our photography, but when we have too much of any of them, it can cause us to derail our work. So let's take a look at those three areas and how we can avoid getting snared in their traps.
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Religion, politics and photography

Episode 232 I think everyone has been to a party where politics and religious topics were not allowed, or you wish they were banned from the family holidays or summer parties. Both of these topics seem to bring out the worst in people's conversational behaviors, and...

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The art of giving up

Episode 231 At some point, we all want to quit. For a host of reasons, we might want to call it a day. Maybe we are tired, bored, fearful, or lost. No matter the cause at some point in your photography, you will want to move on. For some, it might be moving on from...

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The sum of the parts or the parts of the sum?

When you look at an inkblot test, you might see something strange or unusual. You also are likely to see something that someone else might not see. Each of us sees something unique and different, which is why I think many of us are photographers. We find that photography helps us be able to say something about how we see the world around us. As photographers, we are responsible for the entirety of the frame. We are responsible for what is in the frame, out of the frame, and how everything overlaps and exist in the frame. This week's podcast focuses on how we see those parts and how they make up the whole of the frame. We also talk about how to approach working on identifying those parts to make better photographs by seeing how the parts make up the frame and how the frame is also just a part of something bigger.
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Updated: Are you setting the right goals?

There are many ways that people measure success. One of the more common ones that I hear people talk about is achieving goals. Goals are milestones that we set to help us keep focused on attaining something in the future. Some goals can be very short-term, while others might last a lifetime. In this week's podcast, we take a look at the impact goal-setting can have on your productivity and enjoyment of your photography. While goals can be critical to helping you achieve what you want in your creative life, setting the wrong goals, or keeping the wrong goals can be a detriment to success. By taking a hard look at how, why, and when you complete a goal can tell you a lot about your creative process.
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How noise can diminish your photography

This week's podcast focuses on noise reduction in photography. Now you might be thinking that we are going to be talking about how to use the software in Lightroom, Photoshop or other tools to reduce the noise caused by higher ISO settings in digital photography but that is not the case. I am talking about the noise in our heads as we try to make new photographs or look at photographs. In the podcast, we will take a look at the impact of decision-making styles, interruptions, and how we make choices as ways to combat too much noise in our work. Hopefully, you will be able to find some quiet time and reconnect with your internal process for making decisions and celebrate your process as part of your creative life.
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Is over-planning impacting your photography?

This week's podcast focuses on something that has impacted my photography and creative practice more than once--over-planning. When I am getting ready for a big trip or photographic adventure, I do a lot of research about where, when, and what to photograph. All that research can sometimes come in handy, but other times, this results in my over-planning my time costing me some photographic opportunities.In my own process, I have found over-planning shows up and causes me some angst in five primary ways. I don't think one is worse than another, but each can cause problems. Those areas in no particular order are:over-packing too much geargetting too much information to processcan't react at the momentcan't respond to cool changes in the plandisappointment.These five things often show up when I over-plan and don't properly plan for my shoots. Do any of these show up in your process or do you have others not mentioned that happen when you over-plan an adventure?
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Games played and a lost and found

I recently watched a group of kids make up playing a game in the park and it sparked an idea for how to better approach my own photographic practice. This week's podcast takes a look at that process and how the end result made for a new approach to my creative practice. 
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Why photographs should read, draw and sit still

I get asked all the time what it takes to be a better photographer. Is there a class to take or a book to read? I always come back to the basics that photography is about seeing, telling a story, and finding your sense of self in your work. This week's podcast talks about the importance and value of taking the time to draw and sketch, reading all types of books and finally the importance of learning to observe the world around you. 
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The challenge of should and would

In this week's podcast, we take a look at the impacts of talking about the effects of the should and would in our creative photography. So much of what we do as photographers is damaged when we focus on what we should be doing and what we would be doing rather than what we are doing in the present.  In my own experience, should and would are indicators of living in the past or future rather than focusing on what I am doing now in the present. What I would do is future based, and what I should be doing is out of guilt from the past. As discussed in the podcast, there is a huge benefit from learning to let go of saying should and would and embracing the power of focusing on what you are doing right now. 
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