Episode 114: Perception, conception and boredom in photography

Written by Daniel Gregory

I am a Whidbey Island, Wa based fine-art photographer and photographic educator. I am a core faculty member of the Photographic Center Northwest, as well as an instructor for CreateLive and KeblyOne . I also regularly presents at regional and national conferences. I also the host of the weekly podcast The Perceptive Photographer which focuses on the challenges and day-to-day aspects of living as a photographer.

May 15, 2017

I was recently listening to a couple of photographs look at each other’s work. One of the photographers was showing some abstract work. The other photographer wanted to know what the image was a photograph of. The first photographer wouldn’t say because they felt that it didn’t matter to the understanding of the image.

As I listened to them talk, I got to thinking about how we create perceptions of objects and then assign our concepts to those objects. Each being limited by our own understanding of the contents of the frame and our world view. This idea leads me to think about how boredom might cause us to disconnect from work after we figure out what it is. Ultimately to be a good photographer, I believe that you need to be able to step away from the boredom and stay truly connected to the work.

Don’t forget to check out my 2017 Workshops including the Perceptive Photographer Workshop focused on the intersection side of photography.

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